Arab Kingdoms Hall


This is the second hall at the Museum and covers an area of 1500 square meters. The period it covers extends from the fourth millennium BC to the fourth century AD. The exhibits of this period highlight ancient civilizations that arose in the Arabian Peninsula, Arab Kingdoms of the Middle Ages and late Arab Kingdoms.
  • Visitors to the Arab Kingdom Hall can first see a model of the Tayma Wall built with natural stones, which were transferred from the wall itself. The history of the Arab kingdoms is displayed on a screen: Early Arab Kingdoms emerged in the east, north, and northeast of the Arabian Peninsula.
  • On the opposite side of the Tayma Wall, visitors can see a group of stone slabs, four meters in height, which were found at the Khobba site in Tabuk Region. These stone slabs date back to the fourth millennium BC. The hall features a model identifying the history of writing since its beginnings in 3200 BC until the onset of early Arabic script in 1000 BC. The full history of writing is shown on a large screen.
  • The hall features replicas of old panels with different writings and various symbols. Visitors can also see some of the oldest scripts: Thamudic, Dedanit, Lihyanite, Safaitic, Aramaic, Nabatean, and early Islamic writings. The hall also includes recreations of typical cumulus-shaped graves and examples of the tools that accompanied graves. An Assyrian drawing shows the 853 BC «Qarqar» battle between the Arabs and Assyrians, which is one of the most important battles of the ancient world.
  • In the first millennium BC, trade relations between the Near East region, East Africa, South Asia, and the Arabian Peninsula were strengthened. The fact that the Arabian Peninsula was located on a major overland trade route helped in creating a number of flourishing Arab kingdoms such as Edom, Lihyan and Kindah. In the south the Saba›, Qataban, Hadhramaut, Minaean, and Awsan kingdoms were established. Trade and agriculture flourished, generating much wealth and prosperity. Trade commodities included agricultural products, spices, textiles, gold, and frankincense.
  • The hall highlights one of the first civilizations during the early Arab kingdoms era -- known as «Midian» -- which was established in the second millennium BC in the northwest of the Arabian Peninsula.
  • Other exhibits date back to the middle Arab kingdoms, between the eighth and fourth centuries BC. The most famous cities at that time depended on trade and agriculture and included Tayma, Dawmat Jandal, Dedan, and Najran.
  • Ancient tools and exhibits such as glassware, gold, rollers, combs, and pottery found in Al-Faw, the first capital of the Kingdom of Kindah, are on display.
  • Artifacts from Madain Saleh and other sites date back to the Nabataean period are on display.
  • Perhaps the most important discovery from the Arab Kingdom period was the uncovering of the ancient multicultural city of Thaj, which was established in the fourth century BC. Excavations discovered some of Thaj›s oldest minted coins, as well as Thaj Golden Treasure -- otherwise known as The Unknown Princess Treasure -- among other treasures and artifacts. The hall includes a lion’s head and its paw made from bronze, both of which date back to the first century BC, and were found in Najran.

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Inside the National Museum, Riyadh, you can find a captivating display of Saudi Arabia's culture in past and present forms. There are different types of antiques, manuscripts, documents and display boards that showcase an erstwhile era. Inside the National Museum, Riyadh, you can find a captivating display of Saudi Arabia's culture in past and present forms. There are different types of antiques, manuscripts, documents and display boards that showcase an erstwhile era and display boards that showcase an erstwhile era. Inside the National Museum, Riyadh, you can find a captivating display of Saudi Arabia's
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Visiting Hours

Weekdays Schools Public Visits
Sunday 8:00-12:00 school boys 12:00 - 2:00
Monday 8:00-12:00 school girls 12:00 - 8:00
Tuesday 8:00-12:00 school boys 12:00 - 8:00
Wednesday 8:00-12:00 school girls 12:00 - 8:00
Thursday 8:00-12:00 school boys 12:00 - 8:00
Friday 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM

Note:
  • Does not include school and official holidays
  • The visitors are allowed to complete their tour for an hour after the entrance gate is closed
  • Closing time at 8pm, except Sunday at 2pm
 
Registration School Visits
 
Ticket Price

Tickets Person 10 SAR Student / Child
FREE
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